Two photographers sentenced to 25 and 50 lashes

first_img Iran: Press freedom violations recounted in real time January 2020 News Receive email alerts August 19, 2014 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Two photographers sentenced to 25 and 50 lashes Reporters Without Borders is outraged to learn that two photographers based in the city of Qazvin, Khalil Emami and Abass Alipour, have been sentenced to 25 and 50 lashes respectively for criticizing a book of photos published by the Qazvin city government.The online newspaper Sedayeqazvin reported on 13 August that a Qazvin court imposed the medieval sentences in response to a complaint by the local prefect’s cultural adviser against the two journalists and Sedayeqazvin, which published their articles.The first article criticizing the book was written by Emami, who is very well known. After the cultural adviser insulted the article, Alipour responded in a second article. The cultural adviser then announced that he would lodge a complaint against both of them and Sedayeqazvin unless the newspaper apologized, which it refused to do.“Many countries are abolishing jail terms and other harsh sentences for press offences but the Iranian justice system continues to inflict medieval punishments for absurd reasons,” said Reza Moini, the head of the Reporters Without Borders Iran desk.“Condemning two photographers to be whipped is indicative of the Iranian authorities’ contempt for journalists. We call for these sentences to be overturned and we urge Iran to comply with international agreements by ending such ‘cruel, inhuman and degrading’ punishments and recognizing ‘the inherent dignity (…) of all members of the human family’.”This case is unfortunately not isolated. At least 50 journalists and netizens have been sentenced to this kind of inhuman treatment in the past five years. They include Marzieh Rasouli, who writes on arts and culture for several newspapers. Held since 8 July, she was sentenced to 50 lashes and two years in prison.Arash Honarvar Shojai, a theologian and blogger held since 28 October 2010, was sentenced to 50 lashes and four years in prison. He is seriously ill and suffering from a lack of adequate medical care in detention. Sayeed Haeri, a netizen serving a two-year jail term in Tehran’s Evin prison since December 2012, was also sentenced to 74 lashes.Iran is one of the world’s most repressive countries as regards freedom of information. It is ranked 173rd of 180 countries in the 2014 World Press Freedom Index compiled by Reporters Without Borders. Medieval punishment imposed because they criticized a book of photos published by the Qazvin city authorities RSF_en News IranMiddle East – North Africa News IranMiddle East – North Africa Organisation News Help by sharing this information June 9, 2021 Find out more to go further Call for Iranian New Year pardons for Iran’s 21 imprisoned journalists Follow the news on Iran March 18, 2021 Find out more After Hengameh Shahidi’s pardon, RSF asks Supreme Leader to free all imprisoned journalists February 25, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

ECTOR COUNTY FELONY DISPOSITIONS May 13, 2019

first_img Twitter WhatsApp THEFTSalome Alberto Anaya, 31, pleaded guilty April 30 to theft and was sentenced to seven years probation and deferred adjudication. Whalen approved the deal. Tony Chavez was the defense attorney.Gregory Keith Kelton, 47, pleaded guilty April 30 to theft of property, less than $2,500, with two or more previous convictions and was sentenced to nine months in state jail. Whalen approved the deal. Chris Fostel was the defense attorney.Gregory Alan Ledwell, 40, pleaded guilty April 30 to theft and was sentenced to 320 days in state jail. Ledwell was given credit for time served. Whalen approved the deal. Gary Garrison was the defense attorney.Joel Rodriguez Tavarez, 37, pleaded guilty April 30 to theft of property, less than $2,500, with two or more previous convictions and was sentenced to 261 days in state jail. Tavarez was given credit for time served. Whalen approved the deal. Chris Fostel was the defense attorney.Steven Aaron Parum, 59, pleaded guilty May 1 to theft of property, less than $2,500, with two or more previous convictions, and was sentenced to 14 months in state jail. Rush approved the deal. Mike Holmes was the defense attorney.Michael David Brandt, 40, pleaded guilty May 2 to theft of material (copper) and was sentenced to four years probation. Whalen approved the deal. Kevin Acker was the defense attorney. Pinterest DWI WITH CHILD PASSENGERYesenia Estrada, 23, pleaded guilty May 3 to driving while intoxicated with a child under 15 years of age and was sentenced to five years probation. Trotter approved the deal. Carlos Rodriguez was the defense attorney. TAGS  BURGLARYPete McGarity III, 23, pleaded guilty May 1 to burglary of a habitation with intent to commit another felony and was sentenced to five years probation and deferred adjudication. Whalen approved the deal. Justin Low was the defense attorney. INDECENCY WITH CHILDDaeshun Montray Bars, 19, pleaded guilty May 1 to indecency with a child by exposure and was sentenced to 10 years probation and deferred adjudication. Bars also had a charge of aggravated sexual assault of a child dismissed as part of the deal. Rush approved the deal. Tony Chavez was the defense attorney. Facebook EVADING ARRESTJulian Maras Carrasco, 32, pleaded guilty May 1 to evading arrest with a previous conviction and was sentenced to nine months in state jail. Whalen approved the deal. Marc Chastain was the defense attorney.Julian Chavez Franco, 28, pleaded guilty May 1 to evading arrest with a vehicle and was sentenced to three years probation and deferred adjudication. Whalen approved the deal. Justin Low was the defense attorney.Troy Lee Marceleno, 26, pleaded guilty May 1 to evading arrest with a vehicle and was sentenced to three years probation and deferred adjudication. Whalen approved the deal. Matt Byrne was the defense attorney.Michael Chadwick Frazier, 50, pleaded guilty May 2 to evading arrest with a motor vehicle, and was sentenced to eight years in prison. Whalen approved the deal. Don Fletcher was the defense attorney.Aaron David Herrera, 19, pleaded guilty May 2 to evading arrest with a vehicle and was sentence to two years probation and deferred adjudication. Trotter approved the deal. Tony Chavez was the defense attorney.Leonel Reyes Nino, 27, pleaded guilty May 2 to evading arrest with a vehicle and was sentenced to six years probation and deferred adjudication. Trotter approved the deal. John Wolf was the defense attorney.Oswaldo Salazar, 25, pleaded guilty May 2 to evading arrest with a vehicle and was sentenced to five years probation and deferred adjudication. Trotter approved the deal. Mike Holmes was the defense attorney.Manuel Ortega, 22, pleaded guilty May 3 to evading arrest with a vehicle and was sentenced to seven years probation and deferred adjudication. Trotter approved the deal. Tony Chavez was the defense attorney. Twitter Pinterest INTOXICATION ASSAULTJulia Selena Ramirez, 19, pleaded guilty May 2 to intoxication assault with a vehicle causing serious bodily injury and was sentenced to 10 years probation. Trotter approved the deal. Luke Garrett was the defense attorney. DEBIT CARD ABUSETagie W. Burton, 29, pleaded guilty April 30 to debit card abuse and was sentenced to two years probation and deferred adjudication. Whalen approved the deal. Chris Fostel was the defense attorney. WhatsApp By Digital AIM Web Support – February 24, 2021 SEX ABUSE OF CHILDDavid Lee Carnes, 29, pleaded guilty May 1 to continuous sexual abuse of children and was sentenced to 10 years probation and deferred adjudication. Whalen approved the deal. Justin Low was the defense attorney. TAMPER/FABRICATE PHYSICAL EVIDENCEBlaine Lovonna Decker, 30, was sentenced to seven years in prison in an order adjudicating guilt April 22 on a charge of tampering with or fabricating physical evidence with intent to impair. Rush approved the deal. Don Fletcher was the defense attorney.Brian Gene Jenkins, 26, pleaded guilty April 26 to tampering with or fabricating physical evidence and forgery and had his probation revoked. Jenkins was sentenced to two years in prison and 18 months in state jail, respectively on those charges. Rush approved the deal. Don Fletcher was the defense attorney. MANUFACTURE/DELIVERY OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCETravece L. Ennis, 35, pleaded guilty May 1 to manufacture or delivery of a controlled substance, one gram or more but less than four grams, and was sentenced to four years probation. Rush approved the deal. Tony Chavez was the defense attorney.Bobby Eugene Hyde, 48, pleaded guilty May 2 to manufacture or delivery of a controlled substance, four grams or more but less than 200 grams, and was sentenced to eight years in prison. Trotter approved the deal. Thomas Morgan was the defense attorney. POSSESSION OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCEAngelina Linda Llanez, 37, was sentenced to 15 months in state jail in an order adjudicating guilt April 17 on a charge of possession of a controlled substance, less than one gram. Whalen approved the deal. Don Fletcher was the defense attorney.Cesar Damian Maldonado, 23, was sentenced to four years in prison in an order adjudicating guilt April 22 on a charge of possession of a controlled substance, one gram or more but less than four grams. Rush approved the deal. Don Fletcher was the defense attorney.Jason Ray Dedner, 35, was acquitted by a jury April 24 on a charge of possession of a controlled substance (cocaine). Rush presided. Tony Chavez was the defense attorney.Gabriel Scott Martin, 18, was sentenced to 10 months in state jail in an order adjudicating guilt April 26 on a charge of possession of a controlled substance, less than one gram. Rush approved the deal. Carlos Rodriguez was the defense attorney.Latarion Deshay Owens, 30, was sentenced to 10 months in state jail in an order adjudicating guilt April 26 on a charge of possession of a controlled substance (methamphetamine). Rush approved the deal. Carlos Rodriguez was the defense attorney.Timothy Allen Pyper, 56, pleaded guilty April 30 to possession of a controlled substance, less than one gram, and was sentenced to 257 days in state jail. Pyper was given credit for time served. Whalen approved the deal. Chris Fostel was the defense attorney.Simon Alvarado Rodea, 28, had a charge of possession of a controlled substance (marijuana), five pounds or less but more than four ounces, dismissed April 30 because elements of the case could not be proven beyond a reasonable doubt. Whalen presided. Jerry Caddel was the defense attorney.Francisco Sanchez Lopez III, 42, pleaded guilty May 1 to possession of a controlled substance, less than one gram, and was sentenced to 277 days in state jail. Lopez was given credit for time served. Whalen approved the deal. J. Roxane Blount was the defense attorney.Cheyenne Lorenza Talamantes, 20, pleaded guilty May 1 to possession of a controlled substance, less than one gram, and was sentenced to three years probation and deferred adjudication. Whalen approved the deal. Marc Chastain was the defense attorney.Cristian Efren Muniz, 24, pleaded guilty May 2 to possession of a controlled substance, less than 20 abuse units, and was sentenced to three years probation and deferred adjudication. Whalen approved the deal. Carlos Rodriguez was the defense attorney.Eduardo Torres, 28, pleaded guilty May 2 to possession of a controlled substance, less than one gram, and was sentenced to three years probation and deferred adjudication. Trotter approved the deal. Kevin Acker was the defense attorney.Isahia Douglas Trevino, 20, pleaded guilty May 2 to possession of a controlled substance, less than one gram, and was sentenced to 14 months in state jail. Trotter approved the deal. Chris Fostel was the defense attorney. Mayrae Janett Ruvalcaba, 31, pleaded guilty May 3 to possession of a controlled substance, four grams or more but less than 200 grams, and was sentenced to eight years probation. Ruvalcaba also had a charge of bail jumping and failure to appear dismissed. Trotter approved the deal. Carlos Rodriguez was the defense attorney. Facebook ECTOR COUNTY FELONY DISPOSITIONS May 13, 2019 Local News DRIVING WHILE INTOXICATEDCesar Bueno, 32, pleaded guilty May 2 to driving while intoxicated, third or more, and was sentenced to four years probation. Trotter approved the deal. Robert Garcia was the defense attorney.Oscar Lopez, 33, pleaded guilty May 2 to driving while intoxicated, third or more, and was sentenced to five years probation. Trotter approved the deal. Alan Harris was the defense attorney. ASSAULTJonathan L. Aleman, 35, was sentenced to four years in prison in an order adjudicating guilt April 3 on a charge of assault on a security officer. Trotter approved the deal. Jason Leach was the defense attorney.Michael Ray Pherguson, 37, had a charge of aggravated assault with a deadly weapon dismissed May 3 because the victim could not be located. Whalen presided. Kevin Acker was the defense attorney.Martin Shay Sanchez, 29, had a charge of assault of a family or household member by impeding breath or circulation (family violence) dismissed May 3 because he pleaded guilty to misdemeanor assault. Whalen presided. Michael McLeaish was the defense attorney.Russell Vance Shahan, 52, pleaded guilty May 3 to two counts of aggravated assault with a deadly weapon and assault of a family or household member by impeding breath or circulation (family violence) and was sentenced to three years probation and deferred adjudication. Trotter approved the deal. Luis Chavez was the defense attorney. BRIBERYJohn Stephen Bedgood, 35, had a charge of bribery dismissed April 30 because elements of the case could not be proven beyond a reasonable doubt. Whalen presided. Michael McLeaish was the defense attorney. Ector County logo, Scales of Justice The following is a list of felony dispositions from the Ector County District Clerk’s Office. Listed attorneys do not necessarily represent who was involved when the case was disposed. The prosecuting attorney was not listed unless otherwise stated. TAMPER WITH GOVERNMENT RECORDAndrew Alexander Cobos, 34, was sentenced to 12 months in state jail in an order adjudicating guilt April 26 on a charge of tampering with a governmental record. Rush approved the deal. Carlos Rodriguez was the defense attorney. UNAUTHORIZED USE OF VEHICLEJulia Selena Ramirez, 19, pleaded guilty May 2 to unauthorized use of a vehicle and was sentenced to four years probation and deferred adjudication. Trotter approved the deal. Luke Garrett was the defense attorney. INJURY TO CHILD/ELDERLY/DISABLEDJames Clifton Dearmond, 35, pleaded guilty May 2 to injury to a child, elderly or disabled person with intent to cause bodily injury and was sentenced to three years probation and deferred adjudication. Trotter approved the deal. Jason Leach was the defense attorney. Previous articleHIGH SCHOOL BASEBALL: Odessa High vs. El Paso Socorro, Game 1, May 3, 2019Next article052519_Fallen_Heroes_exhibit_JF_02 Digital AIM Web Supportlast_img read more

Covid-19 Vaccines Not Available For Age Group 18-45: Allahabad High Court Directs State Counsel To Seek Instructions From UP Government

first_imgNews UpdatesCovid-19 Vaccines Not Available For Age Group 18-45: Allahabad High Court Directs State Counsel To Seek Instructions From UP Government Akshita Saxena19 May 2021 1:34 AMShare This – xAllahabad High Court Lucknow BenchThe Lucknow Bench of the Allahabad High Court has asked the Additional Chief Standing Counsel of Uttar Pradesh to seek instructions with respect to availability of Covid-19 vaccines in the state, especially with respect to the persons falling in age group of 18-45 The order has been passed by a Division Bench comprising of Justices Rajan Roy and Saurabh Lavania on a PIL filed by Advocate Hari Prasad Gupta. The Bench noted that the petition raises certain “important issues” pertaining to the provision of medical facilities and services to the public at large, as also the lawyers and their wards. “Though the Government has announced for vaccination for the persons of the age-group of 18-44 years, but fact of the matter is that vaccines are not available for this age group,” the Petitioner had submitted. He also stated that: In the first wave of Covid-19 pandemic, once a person was detected as Covid Positive, then the Government Functionaries used to provide the medicines etc. at the home in case of Home Isolation, free of costs. However, during this second wave which is still going on, this facility is not being provided.In the first wave when a situation arose on account of lock-down that Covid-19 infected person were not able to go outside from their house to purchase essential food items for their daily survival, Administration used to make arrangements for providing ration, but during this second wave this is not being done.In the first wave the Para-Medical Staff after completing their duty for the day were being lodged in Hotels or Guest Houses, as the case may be, so that they may not spread the disease, if they had to return to their homes, but during this second wave this arrangement has not been made consequent to which Para-Medical Staff goes back to his or her home after completing the day’s duty which has contributed to the spread of Covid-19 Pandemic. The Court noted that the Principal Bench of the High Court at Allahabad is already considering similar issues in its suo moto PIL pertaining to Covid-19. However, certain issues raised in the instant petition need to be taken note of. Therefore, keeping the question open as to whether this petition should be entertained and proceeded or the Petitioner should be asked to intervene in the proceedings pending at Allahabad, the Division Bench has asked the Additional CSC to seek instructions.”Let Sri H.P. Sriastava, Addl. C.S.C. seek instructions in the matter on the aforesaid points,” it ordered. The matter is now listed for hearing on May 21.Related NewsAmid the rampant shortage of vaccine doses across the nation, the Allahabad High Court recently said that it is unable to understand as to why the Government is not trying to manufacture the vaccine itself on a large scale. It suggested that big medical companies which are working in the country and may not have their own vaccines—may take the formula from just any of the vaccine manufacturers in the world and start producing the vaccine. Case Title: Hari Pasad Gupta v. State of UP & Ors. Click Here To Download Order Read OrderTags#Allahabad High Court covid-19 Vaccine Lucknow Bench of the Allahabad High Court Vaccine for Age Group 18-45 Next Storylast_img read more

Man arrested in connection with murder of Tyrone woman

first_img RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Facebook Google+ Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA Facebook Google+ Man arrested in connection with murder of Tyrone woman WhatsApp Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Pinterest News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th Previous articleLYIT Ladies start campaign with win over UUJNext articleFirst track win for Dylan Browne McMonagle News Highland center_img Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic WhatsApp Detectives have arrested a man in connection with the murder of Charlotte Murray.The 34-year-old Omagh woman was last seen in October 2012.Her body was never found, however her fiance Johnny Miller was found guilty of her murder yesterday following a three week trial.A 47-year-old man was arrested earlier today on suspicion of assisting offenders, withholding information and perverting the course of justice.He has been released on police bail pending further enquiries. Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programme Twitter By News Highland – October 9, 2019 Pinterest Twitter Homepage BannerNews Community Enhancement Programme open for applicationslast_img read more

New Orleans sues Hard Rock Hotel developers over fatal collapse

first_imgSean Pavone/iStockBy ELLA TORRES, ABC News(NEW ORLEANS) — New Orleans Mayor LaToya Cantrell announced that the city has filed suit against the property developers who were overseeing the construction of a Hard Rock hotel that collapsed last year and killed three workers.The collapse occurred Oct. 12, 2019 in the city’s historic French Quarter. The damage was so extensive, it took about 10 months to recover two of the victims’ bodies.“We will continue to hold the building’s ownership accountable and stand with our families to seek justice. This lawsuit is a step towards doing just that,” Cantrell said in a statement.The developers, 1031 Canal, were one of a handful of defendants named in the suit. 1031 Canal did not immediately respond to an ABC News’ request for comment. The company’s contractors were also named, including Heaslip Engineering LLC, which was fined by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration after the collapse. A representative for Heaslip couldn’t be reached.New Orleans City Attorney Sunni LeBeouf said that the city preferred not to engage in litigation, but did so “only because the property owners have failed to right the wrongs they have caused.”The city is seeking unspecified damages. The mayor’s office said responding to the collapse cost taxpayers more than $12 million.“The City has not been compensated in any way for the harm it has suffered in response to this disaster, and this must be addressed immediately in the interest of the people of New Orleans,” said a press release from Cantrell’s office.The brother of one of the construction workers who died told ABC News that his family was losing patience with the recovery process about 10 months after the collapse, when his brother’s remains still were buried inside.“We’re tired of being patient,” Frank Wimberly, the brother of Quinnyon Wimberly, said. He noted that the date of the remains recovery was set for July 1, but by the end of the month it still hadn’t occurred.On Aug. 8, Wimberly’s remains finally were removed. Cantrell’s office didn’t comment on the delay, directing ABC News to 1031 Canal. Officials previously said it was not safe for workers to enter the building to remove the bodies. The body of the third victim, Jose Ponce Arreola, was removed shortly thereafter. The other victim, Anthony Magrette, was removed shortly after the collapse.OSHA cited the “willful” and “serious” violations of Heaslip Engineering LLC as the main reasons for the building’s collapse, according to documents filed by the federal agency. 1031 Canal was not cited in the OSHA complaint.The alleged violations include workers being exposed to falling materials and building collapse, a lack of a health and safety program, and design flaws that affected the structural integrity of the building, according to OSHA. Heaslip Engineering LLC was fined $154,214.James Heaslip, founder of the company, which was the principal engineer on the Hard Rock project, did not respond to ABC News’ request for comment.An attorney for the company told NOLA.com that OSHA’s conclusions were “unwarranted.”“We believe OSHA’s conclusions are unwarranted, not supported by the facts and beyond the jurisdiction of OSHA’s statutory authority,” Kelly Theard, an attorney at DeutschKerrigan LLC, told NOLA.com. “Heaslip unequivocally denies any ‘willful’ or ‘serious’ wrongdoing, and will vigorously contest all of the citations through the procedures required by OSHA.”Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Stephen Ross puts $500K into PAC. Where’s the rest?

first_imgStephen Ross (Getty, iStock)Related Companies chairman Stephen Ross has made no secret of his desire for a more business-friendly mayor in City Hall. But his efforts to get other industry leaders to pour money into the race might not be going as planned.Ross recently made a $500,000 contribution to Vote for NYC’s Future, a super PAC with ties to his development firm, The City reported. Charles John O’Byrne, Related’s executive vice president for policy, is listed as the super PAC’s treasurer. Related declined to comment.The donation is the only contribution the group has received, according to state Board of Election records. And it’s a far cry from the $10 million — or even tens of millions — that Ross reportedly hopes to raise in an effort to “change the future course of the city,” as the New York Times reported last month.Ross, whose net worth is about $7 billion, has reportedly tried to gather other business leaders to pour money into the race to “help us get this mayoral election right,” according to that report. Industry bigwigs have donated substantial sums to a PAC supporting former Citigroup executive Ray McGuire, which has raised more than $1 million, with contributions coming from RFR Holdings’ Aby Rosen and entities tied to the LeFrak family, among others.Read moreWhat to make of Stephen Ross betting $1M on mayor’s raceRay McGuire draws $1.1M in real estate contributionsStephen Ross, wife divorcing after 18 years In the past, Ross has donated to candidates on both sides of the aisle, including former President Donald Trump, for whom he threw a 2019 fundraiser that sparked a backlash that Ross came to regret.In this election cycle he has donated $1 million to Common Sense NYC, an independent expenditure that has already spent about $220,000 on City Council candidates. But he’s remained mum on supporting any particular mayoral candidate, telling the Times that he would back “the one who is best and can help all New Yorkers.”If Ross remains unsure of his choice, he is not alone. Half of voters in a recent poll said they were undecided on the June 22 Democratic primary, which is almost certain to determine the outcome of the general election.[The City] — Amy PlittContact Amy Plitt Full Name* Tags Email Address* Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlink Message* Share via Shortlink Real Estate and PoliticsRelated CompaniesStephen Rosslast_img read more

Sharing ‘the wisdom of Boston’

first_imgA town hall meeting with Boston Mayor-elect Marty Walsh, well-supported by Harvard affiliates, broke into 11 idea-generating sessions on Saturday, focusing on various issues facing the city, from public safety to schools to housing and economic opportunity.The event was coordinated by the Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston at Harvard Kennedy School (HKS). The goal of the meeting, held at Roxbury Community College’s Reggie Lewis Track and Athletic Center, was described by moderator and Rappaport Director Edward Glaeser as sharing “the wisdom of Boston” with the mayor-elect, who Glaeser suggested would be “the most inclusive mayor that I could possibly imagine.”Seven of the sessions were facilitated by members of the Harvard community. Each facilitator presented the session’s recommendations to Walsh in an afternoon meeting attended by about 1,000 people and moderated by Glaeser, who also facilitated the economic development session.Of his own session, Glaeser mentioned “one overriding theme: the benefits [of development] have not been equally shared.” Glaeser garnered widespread applause when he shared his session’s recommendation “to have more community representation on the Boston Redevelopment Authority.”Facilitator Bridget Terry Long, Xander Professor of Education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, told Walsh that the education session had focused on three major themes: closing the achievement gap; collaboration and coordination among schools, parents, community groups, and businesses; and the need for more open communications.Aviva Argote, executive director of the HKS’s Hauser Center for Nonprofit Organizations, facilitated the youth issues session and recommended that Walsh create “more safe spaces, including after-school and summer programs” aimed at keeping Boston’s young people constructively engaged. Argote also suggested “a social justice curriculum requirement in the Boston Public Schools.”The facilitator of the energy, environment, and open space session, Jerold Kayden, Frank Backus Williams Professor of Urban Planning and Design at the Harvard Graduate School of Design, described his session’s vision for Walsh: “to make Boston the most beautiful city in the United States” by implementing such policies as “more and better recycling in city parks” and more coordination among city and state agencies to achieve that lofty goal.The public safety session facilitator, Christine Cole, executive director of HKS’s Program in Criminal Justice Policy and Management, joined Kayden in calling for more city-state coordination in meeting goals, and also recommended more community input in policing to ensure that “police services are delivered fairly and equally to all.”After the session reports concluded, Walsh thanked participants for “a lot of great ideas” and expressed a strong desire to continue the public conversation. “We have to continue this dialogue as we move into office,” he said.As Glaeser walked around the room holding a microphone for questioners, Walsh addressed a number of concerns about education, economic development, and more. Responding to a question about education, Walsh said, “We need to close the achievement gap and get kids on to college.” Answering a question from a recent college graduate about the high cost of living in Boston, Walsh stressed “creating more affordable housing and opportunities for employment” for all city residents.He also expressed support for expanding the hours of operation for the MBTA, and urged audience members “to take the train” whenever possible. When asked whether he would consider suspending development projects recently approved by the Boston Redevelopment Authority, Walsh replied, “We will look at some of the deals, but I won’t stop development” in Boston. Walsh concluded the day by thanking the Rappaport Institute for its contributions.Afterward, Glaeser told the Gazette “it was an honor and privilege to be a part” of the town hall meeting along with other Harvard participants, adding, “We have personnel [at Harvard] who are used to facilitating meetings and have a strong commitment to public service.”last_img read more

Harvard EdCast: The role of education in democracy

first_img Read Full Story Danielle Allen, director of the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics, has long studied what citizens need in order to succeed in democracy and how our social studies and civics education have impacted democracy.In a recent episode of the Harvard EdCast, Allen discussed how the nation got where it is today and what it will take to reinvest in education for democracy.“We have really disinvested in civic education and social studies. You can see that now in the comparison that we currently spend $54 per year per kid of federal dollars on STEM education and only five cents per year per kid on civics,” Allen said. “We have really ceased to lay the foundation in K–12 for young people to understand democracy, be motivated to participate in it, to have the skills and tools they need to participate effectively, and as a result, enjoy participation.”In the episode, Allen discussed how to find ways to tell “an integrated version of U.S. history that is simultaneously honest about the crimes and wrongs of the past, but without falling into cynicism.”To raise engaged citizens, she also suggested bringing democratic practices of reason-giving into the life of a family. “There are lots of lessons inside a family that can feed in to help the understanding of democratic practice,” Allen said.last_img read more

4-H Host Families

first_imgStudents from other countries are coming to Georgia this summer. And the University of Georgia Extension Service is looking for families who would like to help them feel at home while they’re here.Petra Hauser, a 22-year-old horticulture student from Switzerland, will be participating in the International 4-H Youth Exchange Program (IFYE). Hauser’s interests include biking, swimming, skiing, dancing and playing the clarinet. She says she’d like to experience the lifestyle of her host family. Hauser will stay with each Georgia family for one month at most in her summer-long stay. Nine 12- or 13-year-old Japanese students — five girls and four boys — will take part in the 4-H/Japanese Exchange Program for three weeks this summer. All say they want to make new friends and learn from their host families. Their interests range from sports to crafts to caring for animals. Georgia IFYE coordinator Greg Price says being a host to an international student is an easy, intriguing way to see the world. “It gives you an appreciation for different cultures as the world grows smaller,” he said. “You can make lifetime friendships from all over the world.” With the younger students, Price said, the host family must have a child of the same approximate age as the Japanese students. “The emphasis is on the child,” he said. “The child serves as the host. So what we’re really looking for are families that each have a child who is willing to be a host.” Being a host is half of the exchange program. Georgia students also travel and stay with host families abroad. The travel opportunities for Georgia students are over for the year. But it’s not to late to “travel” while staying in your own backyard. If you’d like to host an international student this summer, call (912) 681-0179 to apply.last_img read more

France to transfer critical coronavirus patients by train to ease hospital pressure

first_img“What is planned from the Paris region by TGV (train) is (to transport) 38 sick people,” Bruno Riou, who heads up the Paris hospitals’ crisis team, told reporters in a conference call on Tuesday.”We’re close to knowing whether we will be able to remain under the saturation stage so the regional transfers, notably tomorrow, will be an important security valve even if it’s a small number of patients.”France has already been shuffling patients from the east of the country, where the virus outbreak has overwhelmed hospitals, to other areas and neighboring countries. The army has been drafted to help, while 36 patients were moved to western France from the east on medically outfitted TGV trains on Sunday.France 3 TV reported that the patients from Paris would be moved to Brittany in the country’s northwest.”We had 200 patients in intensive care in mid-March, 1,000 on March 24 and as of today about 1,900. That shows a colossal increase in a very short space of time, which makes things extremely difficult,” said Antoine Vieillard-Baron, head of the surgical and medical Intensive Care Unit (ICU) at the University Hospital Ambroise Pare. Thirty-eight critically ill coronavirus patients will be transferred by high-speed train from the Paris area to less overwhelmed regions on Wednesday to ease pressure on the capital’s intensive-care capacity, French health officials said.France recorded its worst daily coronavirus death toll on Monday, taking the toll above 3,000 for the first time, with the country battling to free up space in life-support units.That has now become critical in Paris, where the number of beds in intensive care units is now practically at the same level as the number of patients. Topics :last_img read more