CRDB Bank Plc (CRDB.tz) Q32015 Interim Report

first_imgCRDB Bank Plc (CRDB.tz) listed on the Dar es Salaam Stock Exchange under the Banking sector has released it’s 2015 interim results for the third quarter.For more information about CRDB Bank Plc (CRDB.tz) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the CRDB Bank Plc (CRDB.tz) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: CRDB Bank Plc (CRDB.tz)  2015 interim results for the third quarter.Company ProfileCRDB Bank Plc is a wholly-owned private commercial bank in Tanzania offering a comprehensive range of retail, commercial, corporate, treasury, premier and wholesale microfinance services. The company has an extensive infrastructure of branches, ATMs and deposit and mobile terminals and uses a vast network of Fahari Huduma agents which are microfinance agents. The retail division offers financial solutions which range from current and fixed deposit accounts to home purchase and construction loans, refinancing and cash back services. The corporate division provides financial service across the board; including documentary collection, letters of credit, guarantees, structured trade finance, treasury services and foreign exchange risk management. Established in 1996, CRDP Bank Plc has three subsidiary companies; CRB Bank Plc Burundi, CRDB Microfinance and CRDB Insurance Brokers.CRDB Bank Plc is listed on the Dar es Salaam Stock Exchangelast_img read more

‘Revolutionary, radical’ ministry initiatives taught church this triennium

first_img Director of Music Morristown, NJ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Under the watchful eyes of previous bishops of Pennsylvania, a group of “pioneers in ministry” sit in a circle at Christ Church, Philadelphia, and talk about their experiences in The Episcopal Church’s Mission Enterprise Zones and New Church Starts project. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceEditor’s note: This is the last in a series of stories about The Episcopal Church’s pledge at the 77th General Convention to partner with dioceses to begin innovative mission strategies. Previous stories are here.[Episcopal News Service]  The first three years of The Episcopal Church’s project of granting greater freedom to people who want to try to reach new believers in new ways have taught its participants about the need for ongoing partnerships and conversation, and for a willingness to take risks, be open to transformation, and to be in it for the long haul.“What I want people to know and begin to understand is how revolutionary and radical this is,” Anne Watkins, the recent chair of the Executive Council’s Joint Standing Committee on Local Mission and Ministry Committee.The committee considered proposals for the $2 million General Convention allocated in the 2013-2015 Five Marks of Mission triennial budget for Mission Enterprise Zones and New Church Starts initiatives.Now, with little more than six months left in the triennium, Watkins told Episcopal News Service that it has become clear to her that the project is “calling us to be transformed fundamentally because we do have to start looking at things and talking and speaking in ways and behaving in ways that are radically different than what we are accustomed to.”The bishops and deputies allotted money for the project as part of The Episcopal Church’s commitment to the first of the Anglican Communion’s Five Marks of Mission: to proclaim the Good News of the Kingdom.The zones were defined in their establishing resolution (A073) as “a geographic area, as a group of congregations or as an entire diocese committed to mission and evangelism that engages under-represented groups, including youth and young adults, people of color, poor and working-class people, people with a high-school diploma or less, and/or people with little or no church background or involvement.” The zones were to have strategic plans with leaders trained in anti-racism, cross-cultural community development, ministry development and evangelism. Bishops and other parts of the diocesan leadership would be expected to grant the zones “greater freedom” in terms of their congregation status, leadership formation and the sorts of liturgical texts that could be used.Grants were available for up to $20,000 for a mission enterprise zone and up to $100,000 for new church starts. Dioceses had to have an equal amount of money on hand and ready to match the grants. The full list of grants for the first round is here and the list of the second round of grants is here.In all, 40 grants were made, ranging from Latino ministries to Warriors for the Dream, a community-enrichment project in Harlem, and from Kairos West Community Center, a community center in West Asheville, North Carolina, to the Abbey in Birmingham, Alabama, where the motto is “Sinners. Saints. Coffee.” In four instances, Episcopalians have partnered with colleagues in other denominations to do the work.General Convention 2015 Resolution A012 proposes a continuation of that funding. And the budget the church’s Executive Council proposed to the convention’s budget committee increases the triennial seed money available to $3 million (line 27 here).Learning from experiences in the first trienniumWatkins, whose Local Mission and Ministry committee poured over and prayed over every proposal to get to the 40 that were funded, said the entire process is radical for a number of reasons, including the fact that the church officially opened itself to listening to “marginalized voices … both the people in our parishes and the people on the street.” The church’s willingness to “give them our trust that they are as able to discern God at work as we are [as] church professionals; I think that is revolutionary because we don’t do that very well.”It has been a case of “not just paying lip service to local ministry or local mission or God at work locally, but to really understanding that God is at work locally and not necessarily within our institutional structures,” she said.“God is so much bigger than our institutional structures,” Watkins continued. “I know we say that and believe it, and I know we use those words and I do trust that people at their core believe that, and yet I also think we get caught in behaviors that are ingrained and learned that go against that tremendously.”The Rev. Stephanie Spellers, who with Ora Houston co-chaired the church’s Standing Commission on the Mission and Evangelism of The Episcopal Church during the 2010-2012 triennium, said experience showed that these sorts of new missional initiatives need support for their diocese beyond the financial kind.(Spellers; the Rev. Deborah Royals, who chaired the commission in the 2013-2015 triennium; and member Megan Anderson formed the commission sub-group that developed the project idea out of all the information gathered over a triennium of listening.)After the first two rounds of Mission Enterprise Zones and New Church Starts, The Episcopal Church has the “stories of leaders who fell in love with what God was doing in the world around them, and that’s really the launching place,” says the Rev. Tom Brackett, the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society’s missioner for church planting and ministry redevelopment. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceWhile “the willingness of diocese to pony up has been heartening” it was also clear that “we can’t be off in a corner somewhere without a bishop and others being in conversation with us,” Spellers said.It took time for some  of the dioceses to engage with the new initiatives being created in their midst, according to Spellers, but soon the word got out around the church and other dioceses that did not make proposals for partnerships in the new venture felt left out.“I think it is a good sign when something has enough impact that other people are looking and asking, ‘How come we didn’t have one of those mission enterprise zones?’ ” Spellers said.But in this first triennium, a number of things began to emerge as themes, Spellers said, thanks in part to how the Rev. Tom Brackett convened initiatives’ leaders and, at times some of their bishops and other diocesan staff, for conversations about their work. Brackett is the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society’s missioner for church planting and ministry redevelopment.(The Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society is the legal and canonical name under which The Episcopal Church is incorporated, conducts business and carries out mission.)Brackett said his goal has been to form a community of learning whose members’ could “lower the cost of failure” in the future by passing on hard-earned knowledge.During an April gathering at Christ Church in Philadelphia, most of the initiatives’ leaders came together for one of those discussions. One of the things that became clear, Brackett said, was that several of the leaders “really did not like the idea that they were [seen as] leading an experiment” because some of them had relocated across states to do this work and did not want to have the diocesan structure pull the plug after three years.During a recent meeting at Christ Church, Philadelphia, Mission Enterprise Zones and New Church Starts project leaders recorded on sticky notes a lesson that cost them something, and that they hoped by sharing it does not cost others as much. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceThe leaders filled part of a meeting room wall with sticky notes on which they listed a lesson that cost them something and that they want to pass on to others in the hope that future leaders can avoid paying that price. One of the prayers read: “No matter how much you think you know or how long you’ve been in ministry, that you may still be open to receive new learnings with a humble heart from the least-likely suspects.”As the leaders, whom Brackett called “pioneers in ministry,” sat in a circle and talked about their experiences, many noted they felt what one called “day-to-day isolation.”Sitting in the outer circle and listening to those comments were participants in the Conference of Diocesan Executives of The Episcopal Church, who were also meeting in Philadelphia. “Help us tear the silos down,” one missional initiative leader asked of the CODE members.Another said she was thankful for “being granted the flexibility to try something, have it not work and then get back up and try something else – sometimes having help to get back up and try something else.”One missional leader said she wanted to state to the large group an issue that had often come up in small-group discussions: How hard it is to have to spend most of their time raising money for their ministry. “We worry about money all the time,” she said. “We would have a lot more freedom to do ministry if that were less true.”After the CODE members moved into the inner circle and the missional leaders moved to the outer edge, one CODE member said diocesan leaders need to hear the stories about how these ministries are transforming lives. “Help us gain new eyes,” another said.Finding a new way to measure the church’s mission, ministryThe projects also have raised in a new way the long-discussed question of whether the churchwide annual parochial report, which every congregation in the church must file, truly measures all of a congregation’s mission and ministry.“Right now, I think our reporting doesn’t allow us to lift and celebrate and learn from” ministry experiences of congregations, Spellers said. “It tends to tilt to who’s got the numbers,” she said. “It’s not to say that numbers don’t matter. I’m not necessarily in that camp either.”She and others want the church to celebrate both the small, new congregation that is having “a new conversation about who Jesus is and how we are living into his body” and the 2,000-member parish with all of its ministries.The Rev. Andrew Green, chair of the House of Deputies Committee on the State of the Church, said his committee agrees with that desire. “There’s lots of stories there and we need a venue for sharing them,” he told ENS in a recent interview.And, he said, the church needs a way to measure the vitality of congregations. Thus, the committee proposed in its report to convention Resolution A038 calling on the church to develop an “index of congregational vitality.” The resolution came in part as a response to Resolution 2012-A010, which asked the committee to identify what new information needed to be added to the report based on “current changes and new realities” in the church.“While The Episcopal Church’s Parochial Report contains vital statistics that we need to know, it is neither the only way, nor perhaps the best way, of assessing congregational vitality,” Resolution A038’s explanation says, noting that some dioceses have added a “fifth page” to the report in “an attempt to capture a sense of exciting new ministries and signs of new and growing spiritual depth, even when other metrics may be static.”The banner on Kairos West Community Center’s Facebook page summarizes the organization’s goals. The Asheville, North Carolina, ministry is a 1-year-old church-in-the-world initiative of the Cathedral of All Souls in Asheville and the Diocese of Western North Carolina. The ministry, based in a former fabric store on increasingly gentrified Hayward Road in West Asheville, received a Mission Enterprise Zone grant. Photo: Kairos West Community Center via FacebookThe Very Rev. David duPlantier, dean of Christ Church Cathedral in New Orleans, agrees. “We measure something that was important in 1967 and was important in 1980 and is important now to some degree,” he told ENS in a recent interview. “But Sunday attendance, baptized members, how much money to get from them, when you look at thousands of people who are in our Episcopal spaces, who are becoming aware of our ‘brand,’ who are becoming maybe comfortable with taking another step into the worship community – that we don’t measure.”Along with all the other reasons to find ways to measure that ministry, duPlantier said, the other reason to do so is to counter Episcopalians’ impression that their church is shrinking and becoming irrelevant, an impression with which duPlantier does not agree.(The parochial report lists the number of each congregation’s active baptized members and communicants in good standing, average Sunday attendance, total number and types of services, Sunday school enrollment, stewardship and other financial information, among other statistics.  A copy of the 2014 parochial report form is here).Meanwhile, the Standing Commission on the Mission and Evangelism of the Episcopal Church proposed a different revision to the parochial report in its 2013-2015 report to the convention. Resolution A084 would add a section for congregations to report their activities as they relate to the Five Marks of Mission. It would also add an attendance category called Average Distinct Attendance, defined as the per-week attendance at all non-Sunday worship services.Resolution A084 would also allow communities such as those formed as mission enterprise zones and new church starts to file parochial reports and capture some of the information about that work.For some “the scope of work that they have proposed is going to take much longer than the triennium and it’s going to require that they go much deeper into the community than the typical worshipping community or church tends to go. So how do we measure their progress?” Brackett asked.The legislative committee on congregational vitality will consider both resolutions, as well as A085 and A012, which would continue the Mission Enterprise Zones and New Church Starts initiative. All of the resolutions assigned to the committee to date are here.What could the next triennium’s project look like?Assuming the funding continues in the 2016-2018 triennium, Watkins said she hopes the Mission Enterprise Zones and New Church Starts initiatives will lead to “bishops and their staffs increasing in their capacity to use different language, to apply different kinds of lenses to look at things to allow greater freedom” in ministry starts.And, she said, “I’d like to see proposals coming from places that we didn’t even talk about in this triennium.”Brackett believes local funding for ministries such as these is hard to access with the church’s current structure, but it’s there. He wonders if a group of congregations could raise the matching money the grants required and also commit to learning how to support such new ministry on an ongoing basis, with the help of the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society’s staff members where appropriate.“We could accomplish a lot more that way and we could actually fund more initiatives than if we strictly went to the diocesan general budget,” he said, adding that the issue of funding new missional initiatives in dioceses that do not have money to match the grants might also have to be addressed.Spellers told ENS that she hopes the Mission Enterprise Zones and New Church Starts initiative is not seen as a “one-off” initiative only intended for the 2013-2015 triennium.“This has to be an ongoing process of experience, learning, growing our capacity as people in mission, investing and essentially creating a research and development arm for The Episcopal Church,” she said. “You can’t do that in one triennium.”Spellers and Brackett said they hope for more one-on-one coaching of people who feel called to these sorts of ministries. Spellers would like to see more work in assessing what sorts of skills and gifts are needed for this type of work, as well as learning as a church about how to train lay and ordained leaders in entrepreneurial ministry, and nurture them in their work.“I am thinking more and more about sustainability and how we create a healthy, flexible infrastructure so that these ministries can that really begin to take off for God,” she added.“I am amazed, I’m happy and what I know is we are all only scratching the surface of what is necessary to embrace mission in our present, much less our future.”– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Featured Events Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Youth Minister Lorton, VA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Smithfield, NC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI ‘Revolutionary, radical’ ministry initiatives taught church this triennium Mission enterprise zones, new church starts point to 21st century evangelism Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit a Press Release Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit a Job Listing Tags The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Albany, NY An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Belleville, IL Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Press Release Service In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Bath, NC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Shreveport, LA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET General Convention, General Convention 2015, Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit an Event Listing Rector Washington, DC Curate Diocese of Nebraska TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Pittsburgh, PA Mission Enterprise Zones Rector Collierville, TN Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Martinsville, VA By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Jun 23, 2015 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Knoxville, TN New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books last_img read more

Pakistan politician speaking at Anglican event rejects treating non-Muslims as…

first_imgPakistan politician speaking at Anglican event rejects treating non-Muslims as minorities Rector Belleville, IL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit an Event Listing The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Anglican Communion, Rector Albany, NY Rector Knoxville, TN Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Posted Oct 26, 2017 Rector Smithfield, NC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Youth Minister Lorton, VA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Submit a Press Release Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit a Job Listing Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Collierville, TN Press Release Service Cathedral Dean Boise, ID The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 [Anglican Communion News Service] The leader of Pakistan’s Jamat-e-Islami political party, Senator Siraj ul Haq, has said that non-Muslims should not be referred to as minorities or put into an inferiority complex. Senator ul Haq, who has led the Islamist party since March 2014, made his comments at an event to mark the completion of the Diocese of Peshawar’s two-year peace and harmony project.Read the full article here. Tags Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Asia, Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Martinsville, VA Ecumenical & Interreligious Rector Hopkinsville, KY Featured Events Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Washington, DC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SClast_img read more

Penafiel House / Graciana Oliveira

first_imgCopyAbout this officeGraciana OliveiraOfficeFollowProductsWoodConcrete#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesPenafielHousesPortugalPublished on December 29, 2014Cite: “Penafiel House / Graciana Oliveira ” 29 Dec 2014. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Read commentsBrowse the CatalogVentilated / Double Skin FacadeTechnowoodProfile Façade SystemGlassMitrexSolar PanelsMetal PanelsAurubisCopper Alloy: Nordic RoyalFiber Cements / CementsEQUITONEFiber Cement Facade Panel PicturaCultural / PatrimonialIsland Exterior FabricatorsSeptember 11th Memorial Museum Envelope SystemConcreteKrytonSmart ConcreteSignage / Display SystemsGoppionDisplay Case – B-ClassMetal PanelsLorin IndustriesAnodized Aluminum – Stainless Steel FinishesWoodStructureCraftEngineering – Mass TimberWindowspanoramah!®ah!38 – FlexibilityChairsSellexChair – IrinaBathroom FurnitureKaleBathroom Cabinets – ZeroMore products »Read commentsSave世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my stream Portugal Houses “COPY” 2012 Area:  432 m² Area:  432 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project photographs:  João MorgadoPhotographs:  João MorgadoCollaborator:Luís BarrosEngineering:Graciana Oliveira, Cecília Machado, Filipe FerreiraBuilder:José Maria Construções Lda.City:PenafielCountry:PortugalMore SpecsLess SpecsSave this picture!© João MorgadoRecommended ProductsDoorsdormakabaEntrance Doors – Revolving Door 4000 SeriesDoorsSky-FrameInsulated Sliding Doors – Sky-Frame ArcDoorsStudcoAccess Panels – AccessDorLouvers / ShuttersTechnowoodSunshade SystemsText description provided by the architects. In a new area of the city, overlooking the city park, the conditions of implantation, areas and levels, have already been defined in the building site.Save this picture!Ground Floor PlanThe ground level is 1.50 meters above the level of the sidewalk. Snipping the wall above this height minimizes its impact. The sight of this fence wall is hardly noticed when we are inside.Save this picture!© João MorgadoWe intend to create volumetric purity, an austere, compact and monochrome volume. The color, dark gray, is used for an intentional perception of reducing the scale of the house in relation to the building site.Save this picture!© João MorgadoIn opposition to the dark and stern outside, in the inside the intention was to create a calm, clear and white space.A free plan is used without losing the definition of each space and the functionality of the whole. Circulations appear as a block, on the north side, maximizing the south orientation for the main part of the house program.Save this picture!© João MorgadoProject gallerySee allShow lessMagaldi and Unamuno Squares / Galpón EstudioSelected ProjectsCasa do Povo da Maia Nursery / M-ArquitectosSelected Projects Share ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/581725/penafiel-house-graciana-oliveira Clipboard Year:  Projects Photographs Architects: Graciana Oliveira Area Area of this architecture project Penafiel House / Graciana Oliveira Save this picture!© João Morgado+ 19 Share 2012 ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/581725/penafiel-house-graciana-oliveira Clipboard CopyHouses•Penafiel, Portugal Year:  “COPY” Penafiel House / Graciana OliveiraSave this projectSavePenafiel House / Graciana Oliveira ArchDailylast_img read more

Henche House / Taller Abierto

first_img “COPY” Housing Save this picture!© Eduardo Mascagni Valero+ 24Curated by Clara Ott Share ArchDaily Architects: Taller Abierto Area Area of this architecture project “COPY” ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/935395/henche-house-taller-abierto Clipboard ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/935395/henche-house-taller-abierto Clipboard Manufacturers: Cortizo, Daikin, Kerakoll, Biocalce Year:  CopyHousing, Renovation•Guadalajara, Spain Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project center_img Henche House / Taller Abierto Henche House / Taller AbiertoSave this projectSaveHenche House / Taller Abierto Spain 2018 Engineering:ETESACollaborators:Jorge López SacristánTechnical Architects:Elena Marián Picazo, Natalia Plaza ParraCity:GuadalajaraCountry:SpainMore SpecsLess SpecsSave this picture!© Eduardo Mascagni ValeroRecommended ProductsWindowsAccoyaAccoya® Windows and DoorsWindowsC.R. LaurenceCRL-U.S. Aluminum Unit-Glaze SystemCeramicsApavisaTiles – JewelsWoodSculptformTimber Click-on BattensText description provided by the architects. After the demolition of a house with no historical value located in the centre of Guadalajara, a new house is designed on a lot that stands between party walls, adapted to a complex and diverse urban setting.Save this picture!© Eduardo Mascagni ValeroSave this picture!Ground Floor and First FloorSave this picture!© Eduardo Mascagni ValeroThe proposal was to respond to a family’s domestic program, made up of a middle-aged couple and their two children. The starting point was that three different homes were to be recognized within the same house, each with its functional characteristics, establishing a relationship of coexistence while maintaining a certain degree of independence.Save this picture!© Eduardo Mascagni ValeroAssigning each unit a floor of the building was considered the most natural solution, trying to take advantage of the height that each floor offered. This was done without ceasing to relate the parts of the intervention with the whole, as not to lose the unity of the proposal. Similar to the meaning of the “Russian dolls”, in which each element is independent but retains an intimate geometric relationship with the whole.Save this picture!© Eduardo Mascagni ValeroSave this picture!Longitudinal SectionsSave this picture!© Eduardo Mascagni ValeroThe orientation with respect to the sun and the urban limitation of having a reduced facade front were determining ingredients from the start of the project. On the one hand, the plot presents two very different faces: the access street with a calm character is to the northeast, while the open courtyards of the block are to the southwest. The dimensional conditioning of a relatively narrow plot was used to characterize the distribution of the interior rooms.Save this picture!© Eduardo Mascagni ValeroThe first structuring decision of the house, taking into account the sunlight and the character of the access street, was to direct the daytime areas to the south and the bedrooms to the north facade. The living areas and kitchens are nourished by the sun and the interior views, each level also enjoying a large sunny outdoor space: a courtyard on the ground floor and two large terraces on the first and third floors. In order to be able to use these outdoor spaces as one more room of the house, a succession of light structures were designed as pergolas, supporting textile surfaces that offer shade during the summer. The house could be explained synthetically by attending to its section: a cascading succession of exterior spaces open to the south, visually related to each other and enjoying the sunshine, to which the day areas are opened, and a backside that faces north and the access street, where the night-time areas are located.Save this picture!© Eduardo Mascagni ValeroSave this picture!Constructive SectionSave this picture!© Eduardo Mascagni ValeroProject gallerySee allShow lessThe Comeback of Craftmanship and Artisanal Aesthetics in 3D PrintingArticlesDawar El Ezba Cultural Center / Ahmed Hossam SaafanSelected ProjectsProject locationAddress:Guadalajara, SpainLocation to be used only as a reference. It could indicate city/country but not exact address. Share Projects Daniel Martínez Díaz , Nacho Román Santiago, Julio Rodríguez Pareja Area:  324 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project Lead Architect: CopyAbout this officeTaller AbiertoOfficeFollow#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousingRefurbishmentRenovationGuadalajaraOn FacebookSpainPublished on March 12, 2020Cite: “Henche House / Taller Abierto” [Casa Henche / Taller Abierto] 12 Mar 2020. ArchDaily. Accessed 10 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Browse the CatalogBathroom AccessorieshansgroheBath & Shower ThermostatsGlass3MGlass Finish – FASARA™ NaturalPartitionsSkyfoldVertically Folding Operable Walls – Mirage®WindowsVitrocsaSliding Window – Mosquito NetSinksBradley Corporation USASinks – Verge LVG-SeriesMetal PanelsTrimoQbiss One in Equinix Data CentreSignage / Display SystemsGoppionDisplay Case – Q-ClassMetal PanelsLongboard®Aluminum Battens – Link & Lock – 4″Sports ApplicationsPunto DesignPunto Fit in Ekaterinburg Public SpaceWoodBlumer LehmannFree Form Structures for Wood ProjectsKnobsKarcher DesignDoor Knob K390 (50)TablesVitsœ621 Side TableMore products »Save世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my streamlast_img read more

RNIB surveys site visitors

Howard Lake | 4 July 2000 | News RNIB surveys site visitors RNIB is running an online questionnaire to find out more about its Web site visitors. Participants are subsequently sent a more detailed paper-based questionnaire: respondents can win a holiday. This incentivised promotion is featured prominently on the main page of the RNIB site. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis  12 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. read more

Amnesty’s online shop gets good review

first_img Tagged with: Digital Trading Davies found the site “a pleasure to use, with most of the products quality-assured” and awards it three out of five stars. Howard Lake | 13 November 2003 | News  30 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis New Media Age magazine gives Amnesty International’s online shop three out of five stars this week and describes it as “a pleasure to use.”Amnesty International UK launched relaunched its online shop in January 2003 in partnership with New Internationalist, which handles all the merchandise and orders for the campaigning body.Sara Davies reviews the site in the fulfilment section of “site inspection”, the magazine’s regular back-page analysis of a range of Web sites. She finds the navigation “very straightforward” and did not experience any technical problems. The site had a good returns policy and a clear delivery timescale, including flagging up a deadline for orders to arrive in time for Christmas. However, her order did not arrive within the two weeks specified, although a phone call swiftly resolved that. Advertisementcenter_img Amnesty’s online shop gets good review AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

Alzheimer’s Society develops training package to help telephone fundraisers recognise vulnerability

first_img About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Tagged with: ethics Individual giving Telephone fundraising Training Alzheimer’s Society has responded to recent criticisms of some telephone fundraisers’ interactions with vulnerable people by developing a new telephone fundraising training package. It is designed to ensure that telephone fundraisers recognise vulnerability in people they call and handle contact with individuals in a way that is sensitive to their individual needs.The charity is sharing its expertise in supporting people living with dementia by offering a practical tool to help improve the wider charity sector’s fundraising contacts with vulnerable people. The training will be made available to all charities and their agencies in November.The question of how some staff at telephone fundraising agencies had treated people living with dementia was raised by The Daily Mail in its investigation into GoGen, and in its claims about some of the RSPCA’s legacy fundraising activities.How will the training help fundraisers?The awareness and skills that the training programme will provide and reinforce include:• the ability to recognise situations where the recipient may not interpret what is being said in the way intended• identifying vulnerability when speaking with a person via telephone• understanding the importance of listening to the person rather than simply delivering a script• identifying other communication methods to aid understanding• recognising the importance of honesty and integrity Dementia FriendsThe training package will include Dementia Friends awareness sessions. The charity launched this initiative in February 2013 with the aim of helping more people develop an understanding of dementia, how it affects others and the small things that they can do that could make a difference to people living with the condition.Jon Bodenham, Director of Fundraising at Alzheimer’s Society said: Advertisement AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis2 Howard Lake | 18 September 2015 | News “It is unacceptable that people living with dementia are being exploited by fundraising approaches which fail to take proper account of a person’s vulnerability. Alzheimer’s Society is committed to leading the way in demonstrating good practice and supporting others to do so. The new training package that we have developed will equip telephone fundraisers with vital skills to protect the most vulnerable people in society, and additionally help in addressing the broader problem of lack of understanding and awareness of dementia.“Alzheimer’s Society champions the rights for people living with dementia and while living with dementia is not always a barrier to making informed decisions, and people with the condition should have opportunities to support charitable causes of their choice, it is imperative that fundraising practice safeguard these individuals.”  50 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis2 Alzheimer’s Society develops training package to help telephone fundraisers recognise vulnerabilitylast_img read more

Vilsack Announces New Drought Assistance, Designates an Additional 2 Counties in…

first_img Facebook Twitter SHARE Primary counties and corresponding states designated as disaster areas today: Facebook Twitter By Gary Truitt – Aug 1, 2012 Home Indiana Agriculture News Vilsack Announces New Drought Assistance, Designates an Additional 2 Counties in Indiana… Vilsack Announces New Drought Assistance, Designates an Additional 2 Counties in Indiana as Primary Disaster Areas Emergency Haying and GrazingIn response to the expanding drought, Secretary Vilsack today announced that livestock producers and other participants in the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) will now be able to hay and graze acres that have been ineligible in the past. Many of these additional acres have wetland-related characteristics and are likely to contain better quality hay and forage than on other CRP acres. There are approximately 3.8 million acres that will now be eligible for emergency haying and grazing, subject to certain conditions. Haying and grazing may only occur under strict compliance rules to help minimize impacts on these sensitive specialty practices. In addition, USDA will conduct follow-up monitoring and evaluation of these opened CRP areas to study the effects of the drought and USDA’s emergency haying and grazing actions. Producers should contact their local Farm Service Agency offices for additional information. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack today announced two new pieces of disaster assistance for farmers and ranchers impacted by the nation’s worsening drought. First, Vilsack is expanding emergency haying and grazing on approximately 3.8 million acres of conservation land to bring greater relief to livestock producers dealing with shortages of hay and pastureland. Second, the Secretary announced that crop insurance companies have agreed to provide a short grace period for farmers on insurance premiums in 2012. As a result, farming families now have an extra 30 days to make payments without incurring interest penalties on unpaid premiums. He also added Jackson and  Warren  to the list of Indiana counties declared natural disaster areas.center_img Allowing additional acres under CRP to be used for emergency haying or grazing. The action allows lands that are not yet classified as “under severe drought” but that are “abnormally dry” to be used for haying and grazing.Allowing producers to modify current Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) contracts to allow for grazing, livestock watering, and other conservation activities to address drought conditions.Authorizing haying and grazing of Wetlands Reserve Program (WRP) easement areas in drought-affected areas where haying and grazing is consistent with conservation of wildlife habitat and wetlands. USDA has expedited its authorization process for this haying and grazing.Encouraging crop insurance companies to provide a short grace period for farmers on unpaid insurance premiums, as some farming families can be expected to struggle to make ends meet at the close of the crop year.Reducing the emergency loan interest rate from 3.75 percent to 2.25 percent.Lowering the reduction in the annual rental payment to producers on CRP acres used for emergency haying or grazing from 25 percent to 10 percent in 2012.Simplifying the Secretarial disaster designation process and reduced the time it takes to designate counties affected by disasters by 40 percent. Federal Crop InsuranceSecretary Vilsack announced today that crop insurance companies have agreed to provide a short grace period for farmers on insurance premiums in 2012. To help producers who may have cash flow problems due to natural disasters, Secretary Vilsack sent a letter to crop insurance companies asking them to voluntarily defer the accrual of any interest on unpaid spring crop premiums by producers until November 1, 2012. In turn, to assist the crop insurance companies, USDA will not require crop insurance companies to pay uncollected producer premiums until one month later.During the 2012 crop year, USDA has designated 1,584 unduplicated counties across 32 states as disaster areas—1,452 due to drought—making all qualified farm operators in the areas eligible for low-interest emergency loans. The U.S. Drought Monitor indicates that 66 percent of the nation’s hay acreage is in an area experiencing drought, while approximately 73 percent of the nation’s cattle acreage is in an area experiencing drought. During the week ending July 29, USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service reported that U.S. soybeans rated 37 percent very poor to poor, matching the lowest conditions observed during the drought of 1988. NASS also reported that 48 percent of the U.S. corn crop was rated very poor to poor, while 57 percent of the nation’s pastures and rangeland are rated very poor or poor condition.Last week, President Obama met with Secretary Vilsack and members of his Cabinet to discuss additional steps the Administration could take to help farmers, ranchers and business owners manage and recover from the current drought. Later in the week, President Obama directed Secretary Vilsack to convene a meeting of the White House Rural Council to update members and stakeholders on the Administration response to the drought. Vilsack will update Rural Council members and stakeholders again next week on new steps taken by the Administration to combat the drought.Other USDA  announced  steps to get assistance to producers impacted by the worsening drought: Earlier in the day, Vilsack signed disaster designations for an additional 218 counties in 12 states as primary natural disaster areas due to damage and losses caused by drought and excessive heat. Counties designated today are in the states of Arkansas, Georgia, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Mississippi, Nebraska, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Tennessee, and Wyoming. More than half (50.3 percent) of all counties in the United States have been designated disaster areas by USDA in 2012, mainly due to drought “President Obama and I will continue to take swift action to get help to America’s farmers and ranchers through this difficult time,” said Vilsack. “The assistance announced today will help U.S. livestock producers dealing with climbing feed prices, critical shortages of hay and deteriorating pasturelands. Responding to my request, crop insurance companies indicated that producers can forgo interest penalties to help our nation’s farm families struggling with cash flow challenges. The Obama Administration intends to continue helping those who farm or ranch and live and work in rural America through this period of hardship.” ArkansasBentonWashingtonGeorgiaBartowCherokeeCobbHaralsonPauldingPolkIllinoisAdamsBondBooneBrownCalhounCarrollCassChampaignChristianClarkClayClintonColesCumberlandDe WittDouglasEdgarEffinghamFayetteFordFultonGreeneHancockHendersonIroquoisJasperJeffersonJerseyJo DaviessLa SalleLeeLivingstonLoganMaconMacoupinMadisonMarionMarshallMasonMcDonoughMcLeanMenardMonroeMontgomeryMorganMoultrieOglePeoriaPerryPiattRandolphRock IslandSangamonSchuylerScottShelbySt. ClairStephensonTazewellVermilionWarrenWashingtonWayneWhitesideWinnebagoWoodfordIndianaJacksonWarrenIowaAppanooseBentonBlack HawkBooneBremerBuchananButlerCedarClaytonClintonDavisDelawareDes MoinesDubuqueFayetteGrundyHamiltonHardinHenryIowaJacksonJasperJeffersonJohnsonJonesKeokukLeeLinnLucasMahaskaMarionMarshallMonroeMuscatinePolkPoweshiekScottStoryTamaVan BurenWapelloWayneKansasAtchisonBrownDoniphanJacksonMississippiMarshallNebraskaAntelopeArthurBannerBlaineBrownBuffaloBox ButteCedarChaseCherryCheyenneDawesDawsonDeuelDixonFranklinGardenGarfieldGosperGrantHallHarlanHoltHookerKearneyKeithKeya PahaKimballKnoxLincolnLoganLoupMadisonMcPhersonMorrillPerkinsPhelpsPiercePlatteRockScotts BluffSheridanSiouxStantonThomasWayneWheelerOklahomaAdairCherokeeDelawareHaskellMayesMcIntoshMuskogeeOkmulgeeRogersSequoyahTulsaWagonerSouth DakotaBennettBon HommeButteCharles MixClayCusterDavisonDouglasFall RiverGregoryHaakonHansonHutchinsonJacksonLawrenceLincolnMcCookMeadePenningtonShannonToddTrippTurnerUnionYanktonTennesseeFayetteHaywoodLauderdaleWyomingAlbanyCampbellConverseCrookGoshenNiobraraPlatteWeston Also today, U.S. Department of Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood will convene a call with states to listen and discuss the ways in which U.S. DOT can work with Governors and State Departments of Transportation to help communities impacted by the drought. Secretary LaHood will be joined by both Anne Ferro, Administrator of the Federal Motor Carriers Safety Administration and Greg Nadeau, Deputy Administrator for the Federal Highways Administration. SHARE Previous articleIndiana Joins Soybean Celebration in ChinaNext articleSenate Committee to Vote On Energy Tax Incentives Gary Truittlast_img read more

Mexico: Press freedom organisations demand re-opening of Regina Martínez investigation

first_img A new report on the murder of Mexican journalist Regina Martínez finds strong indications for obstruction of justice by local authorities. Leading press freedom organisations Reporters Without Borders (RSF), Free Press Unlimited (FPU), and the Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ) now call on Mexican federal authorities to re-open and attract the case and bring the killers to justice. Reports Regina Martínez was murdered in the Mexican state of Veracruz in 2012, when Veracruz was at the forefront of Mexico’s many drug wars. After the murder, the Veracruz state prosecutor’s office investigated the case, leading to the arrest and conviction of a suspect. The report “The Murder of Regina Martínez Perez: an Opportunity for Justice” published by FPU, RSF and CPJ documents a series of serious anomalies in the official investigation conducted by the Veracruz authorities. Specifically, the report finds that the main suspect for the murder has been convicted on the basis of a confession that was obtained under torture. Furthermore, the report presents several witness statements that severely challenge the official murder theory. Finally, the report finds indications that Martínez was murdered for a specific publication related to a political affair.The report concludes that the investigation into the murder of Regina Martínez was compromised at the state level. It records strong indications of obstruction of justice by investigators acting under the authority of the State Attorney General of Veracruz. Given these findings, press freedom organisations are calling on Mexico’s Special Prosecutor for Attention to Crimes committed against Freedom of Expression (FEADLE) to take over jurisdiction of the case of Regina Martínez in order to make progress with the investigation. “Regina Martínez was a brave journalist, who died for telling the truth. Her murder must be resolved and justice must be achieved”, states Christophe Deloire, Secretary General of Reporters Without Borders (RSF).“Killing a journalist is the world’s safest crime: in nine out of ten cases the killer goes free. To break the cycle of impunity, Mexican authorities must step up their efforts to ensure justice for Regina Martínez”, states Leon Willems, Director at Free Press Unlimited (FPU) .“Mexico has long been one of the most dangerous places for journalists to work. Mexican authorities must do their utmost to address impunity, and bring those who kill journalists to justice. Reopening the case of Regina Martínez is an important step to doing just that”, said Joel Simon, Executive Director of the Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ).Mexico is the most dangerous country for journalists in the Western Hemisphere. According to research by CPJ, at least five journalists were murdered in direct relation to their work in 2020. Veracruz has long been the deadliest state in the country for the press, with at least 21 journalists murdered there between 2011 and 2020.The report “The Murder of Regina Martínez Perez: an Opportunity for Justice” was published as part of A Safer World For The Truth, an initiative by Free Press Unlimited (FPU), Reporters Without Borders (RSF) and the Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ), to pursue justice for murdered journalists worldwide. The report is the first in a series of investigations into unsolved murders of journalists worldwide. The full investigation and its recommendations can be found at https://www.saferworldforthetruth.com/investigations.Mexico is ranked 143rd out of 180 countries in RSF’s 2020 World Press Freedom Index. 2011-2020: A study of journalist murders in Latin America confirms the importance of strengthening protection policies Follow the news on Mexico May 5, 2021 Find out more MexicoAmericas Protecting journalists WomenImpunityViolence Receive email alerts Free Press Unlimited March 16, 2021 – Updated on March 17, 2021 Mexico: Press freedom organisations demand re-opening of Regina Martínez investigation Reporter murdered in northwestern Mexico’s Sonora state Newscenter_img Organisation Help by sharing this information News May 13, 2021 Find out more MexicoAmericas Protecting journalists WomenImpunityViolence April 28, 2021 Find out more NSO Group hasn’t kept its promises on human rights, RSF and other NGOs say News RSF_en to go furtherlast_img read more